Tag Archives: Baltimore

Law enforcement revives crime fighting initiatives as communities see recent spike

My latest piece in The Hill entitled “Law enforcement revives crime fighting initiatives as communities see recent spike” breaks down some of the “new” crime-fighting initiatives in cities like Baltimore & Chicago; and examines their potential effectiveness. Please share your thoughts and let’s discuss.

To read the entire column, click here.

The Hill: Jeff Sessions is right to roll back Justice Department consent decrees

On Monday, April 3, 2017,  ordered a review of the many controversial and highly politicized consent decrees issued by the US Department of Justice over the last decade, and why so many in the criminal justice community want to see them gone.  This was the subject of my April 5, 2017 column in The Hill, which can be read by clicking here.

 

What’s Missing from the DoJ Civil Rights Division’s Police Investigations

baltimore police doj report

Vanita Gupta, the head of the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division, discussed the department’s findings on the investigation into the Baltimore City Police Department with Police Commissioner Kevin Davis, and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. Associated Press/Brian Witte

Today, I was published in The Hill, in regards to the US Justice Department, Civil Rights Division’s release of a scathing, 163 page report on Wednesday, which details their investigation into the Baltimore City Police Department (BPD). The report concluded that BPD has exhibits systematic racial bias against African-Americans.

This DoJ report is quite similar to the ones written following investigations in Los Angeles, Washington, DC, Ferguson, MO and Albuquerque, NM following controversial police uses of force.

However, in reviewing the report’s findings, one is left to wonder what elements are missing from these scathing reports that seem very quick to cite race as the pivotal factor in their conclusions.  Furthermore, one is left to wonder what the lasting effect these reports and their resulting consent decrees have on policing in their respective cities. At the end of the day, the nature of these DoJ reports can beg the question of their effectiveness.  Could a better use of governmental resources can easily be directed at the reasons crime is so high in the very communities where these DoJ reports are focused? If we, as a collective, recognize the job of the police, in responding to and preventing crime in the context of the high-crime areas where these investigations are conducted; then we can understand these statistics much better.

Please read the whole article and my talking points by visiting The Hill by clicking here, free of charge.