Tag Archives: DOJ

Law enforcement revives crime fighting initiatives as communities see recent spike

My latest piece in The Hill entitled “Law enforcement revives crime fighting initiatives as communities see recent spike” breaks down some of the “new” crime-fighting initiatives in cities like Baltimore & Chicago; and examines their potential effectiveness. Please share your thoughts and let’s discuss.

To read the entire column, click here.

Mannes discusses Consent Decrees on the Rich Zeoli show

Click here to listen to a discussion about Attorney General Jeff Sessions‘ review of DOJ’s consent decree practices on the April 13, 2017 episode of the Rich Zeoli Show, afternoons from 3-6PM on CBS Radio, 1210 AM WPHT in Philadelphia.

Share, comment and join the discussion!

The truth about sanctuary cities

My April 13th, 2017 column in The Hill​ is an in-depth, historical look at the highly politicized sanctuary city issue and the potentially dangerous precedents it sets.

Please click here to read it, share it, and discuss  it as I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Washington Times: Was Obama’s clemency applied fairly?

It was a true honor for my latest piece to have been published yesterday in the Washington Times by the legendary David A. Keene. It examines the lopsided, unfair nature in where the Obama Administration used its Clemency Authority; and how it may have hurt the cause of Criminal Justice Reform more than helping it.

Click here to read the whole story.

The Hill: ‘Status offenses’ limit criminal justice reform efforts

My latest piece in The Hill takes on how some politically charged types of crime are becoming modern-day “Status Offenses” & how that impacts Criminal Justice Reform efforts. Please share and discuss as I’d love to hear your thoughts on this one, as it impacts me personally.

To read the full article, please click here.

Lessons from Charlotte: When a protest is just a riot

This week, an non-permitted demonstration in Downtown Charlotte escalated into a mass of property damage and the murder of a protester by another protester in the crowd. The media reported this by labeling it as a “Violent Protest”.  Similar labels were attached to riots in Baltimore, Ferguson and Milwaukee; but when there’s clear evidence of multiple crimes being committed during a “protest”, it’s officially defined a riot.

On September 23, 2016, my latest piece was published in The Hill that analyzes the events in Charlotte and defines this issue more clearly.  To read the full story,click here.

John Cardillo & Ben Mannes discuss tactics and the Tulsa shooting

Ben Mannes appeared again on The John Cardillo Show, which airs weekday mornings on WBIZ 880AM in Miami/Fort Lauderdale, to discuss the latest controversial police shooting of an unarmed suspect. The shooting of Terrence Crutcher, an unarmed black suspect with PCP in his vehicle by Tulsa Police Officer Betty Shelby was, in my opinion about poor tactics and/or training, not her justification to use deadly force.

In watching the video, it was clear that Crutcher should have complied and was being given clear and lawful orders, ignoring them by walking back to his vehicle (albeit with his hands up).  Tactically, I believed this to call for nonlethal/less-lethal force such as a taser, takedown, or impact weapon. Had Officer Shelby and her backup officers bridged the distance and attempted a less lethal intervention method he got to his driver’s door, Crutcher would be alive and in custody now.

On an important note, had Crutcher listened and lawfully complied with Shelby (which is hard to do on PCP), and the officers on the scene not been afraid to go ‘old school’ and put hands on him; Crutcher would be alive today.

What’s Missing from the DoJ Civil Rights Division’s Police Investigations

baltimore police doj report

Vanita Gupta, the head of the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division, discussed the department’s findings on the investigation into the Baltimore City Police Department with Police Commissioner Kevin Davis, and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. Associated Press/Brian Witte

Today, I was published in The Hill, in regards to the US Justice Department, Civil Rights Division’s release of a scathing, 163 page report on Wednesday, which details their investigation into the Baltimore City Police Department (BPD). The report concluded that BPD has exhibits systematic racial bias against African-Americans.

This DoJ report is quite similar to the ones written following investigations in Los Angeles, Washington, DC, Ferguson, MO and Albuquerque, NM following controversial police uses of force.

However, in reviewing the report’s findings, one is left to wonder what elements are missing from these scathing reports that seem very quick to cite race as the pivotal factor in their conclusions.  Furthermore, one is left to wonder what the lasting effect these reports and their resulting consent decrees have on policing in their respective cities. At the end of the day, the nature of these DoJ reports can beg the question of their effectiveness.  Could a better use of governmental resources can easily be directed at the reasons crime is so high in the very communities where these DoJ reports are focused? If we, as a collective, recognize the job of the police, in responding to and preventing crime in the context of the high-crime areas where these investigations are conducted; then we can understand these statistics much better.

Please read the whole article and my talking points by visiting The Hill by clicking here, free of charge.