Tag Archives: Physical security

The Three Interconnected Components of Security

My latest professional article in LinkedIn details some basic components needed to create a comprehensive security program within a professional organization. It’s intended to prevent the compartmentalization and failure to designate appropriate security leaders so that assets can be protected in an efficient and effective manner.

To read the full article, click here.

The Need for Comprehensive Transportation Security

On May 3, 2017; I wrote an extensive article on LinkedIn as an in-depth examination for the need of increased security focus in the transportation sector, especially among Ports and Transit Agencies. It is an analysis of Transportation Security Administration (TSA) programs, to include the Surface Transportation Security Inspection Program (STSIP); and why the onus on security should be taken on primarily by the Transit Authority, Rail Service, Trucking Company and/or Port Authority. When looking at the benchmarks of the Los Angeles Port Police, WMATA Metro-Transit Police, SEPTA Transit Police, and Port Authority of NY/NJ; the nation’s best practices in transportation security are coming from local authorities with the fiscal support of the federal government, and not vice-versa.

To read this article, click here.

The Hill: Words matter: How politicians politicize terror attacks

Please read and share the piece I wrote in The Hill on September 18, 2016 regarding the terror attacks in New York, New Jersey, and Minnesota over the weekend, and questions about the honesty of the language used by local political leaders to brief the public on them.

To read the full article, please click here.

John Cardillo Show: Ben Mannes on Police Ambushes, Terrorism and Immigration

Mannes was a guest on the John Cardillo Show on Monday, 9/19/16 to discuss two ambushes on Philadelphia Police, his recent article in The Hill entitled Background Checks: the Achilles Heel of Immigration Reform, and the recent Terrorist Attacks on New York, New Jersey and Minnesota.

What’s Missing from the DoJ Civil Rights Division’s Police Investigations

baltimore police doj report

Vanita Gupta, the head of the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division, discussed the department’s findings on the investigation into the Baltimore City Police Department with Police Commissioner Kevin Davis, and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. Associated Press/Brian Witte

Today, I was published in The Hill, in regards to the US Justice Department, Civil Rights Division’s release of a scathing, 163 page report on Wednesday, which details their investigation into the Baltimore City Police Department (BPD). The report concluded that BPD has exhibits systematic racial bias against African-Americans.

This DoJ report is quite similar to the ones written following investigations in Los Angeles, Washington, DC, Ferguson, MO and Albuquerque, NM following controversial police uses of force.

However, in reviewing the report’s findings, one is left to wonder what elements are missing from these scathing reports that seem very quick to cite race as the pivotal factor in their conclusions.  Furthermore, one is left to wonder what the lasting effect these reports and their resulting consent decrees have on policing in their respective cities. At the end of the day, the nature of these DoJ reports can beg the question of their effectiveness.  Could a better use of governmental resources can easily be directed at the reasons crime is so high in the very communities where these DoJ reports are focused? If we, as a collective, recognize the job of the police, in responding to and preventing crime in the context of the high-crime areas where these investigations are conducted; then we can understand these statistics much better.

Please read the whole article and my talking points by visiting The Hill by clicking here, free of charge.

Philadelphia Metro: Barriers and Burritos

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